IN THE NEWS

Image and Style: Ms. Adventure Alison Levine

alison levine

At age 44, this American mountain climber, explorer, sportswoman and entrepreneur completed the last degree Adventure Grand Slam by reaching the summit of Mt. Everest. She has since transitioned into being a motivational and leadership speaker as well as being an author who penned a New York Times bestseller. She’s an inspiration to us and we hope you’ll feel likewise. Meet Ms. Adventure Alison Levine.

I&S: In your travels around the globe you have most likely met hundreds of fellow travelers. What do you perceive as the commonalities among those who seek the thrill of adventuring? Have you any reason to believe that some people are born adventurers?

AL: One thing that most adventurers have in common is a strong sense of curiosity. Curiosity not just about what lies “off the beaten track” – but a curiosity about themselves. They aren’t afraid to test themselves and operate completely outside of their comfort zones. Adventurers also have a need to see, feel and understand what lies outside of the everyday environments that surround most people on a day-to-day basis. As far as being “born” an adventurer – I actually think that anyone can catch the adventure bug and that it is more a function of the combination of that sense of curiosity mixed with open-mindedness and encouragement from people in your circle (and by that I mean parents, friends, teachers, siblings, etc. – anyone who has an influencing role in someone’s life).

I&S: What triggered your desire to mountaineer and/or expedition to the North/South poles? Can you describe the feeling of accomplishment you get from achieving your goals?

AL: From the time I was younger I was always very intrigued by the stories of the early mountaineers and the early Arctic and Antarctic explorers. I would read books and watch documentary films about them…and could never seem to take in enough information about these adventurers. I had my second heart surgery when I turned 30 (the first was at age 17 was not successful at correcting the heart defect I was born with) and after that a light bulb went on in my head and I thought: If I really want to know what it’s like to explore these extreme environments, then I should go experience them myself instead of simply reading about them.
As for the feeling of accomplishment, the things I focus on have changed over the years as I’ve grown older and wiser (well, hopefully wiser!). Instead of focusing on getting to the tops of mountains, I focus on what I can do to be the MVP of my team. While it’s always a bonus to get to the top of the mountain or to the North or South Pole, my goal is for the people on my team to look back on the experience and think, ”I am really glad she was part of our team.” That is what gives me that sense of accomplishment.

I&S: Preparation must play a large part in your journeys. Can you tell us about the physical, mental and practical considerations leading up to the start of one of your trips? Where do sponsorships come in with regard to going on expeditions?

AL: The only way to really prepare for a serious expedition is to simulate what it is that you’ll be doing during the trip. For example, if I am going to try to tackle a big mountain, I have to get out to the mountains to train. That means a six hour drive for me (each way) as I prefer to train on Mt. Shasta which is about 300 miles from my home in northern California. If I’m going to be dragging a 150 pound sled across the Arctic Circle or across the Antarctic continent then I have to try to simulate that experience. That means going out to the beach and harnessing a couple of tires to my waist and dragging them across the sand in order to simulate dragging the heavy sled across the ice. This is part of the physical and mental training because a lot of the time it can feel monotonous – and that feeling can certainly be part of these expeditions too! Training in a gym is not really going to help me prepare properly—mentally or physically.
As far as the sponsorships go, I have been very lucky in that I have been able to secure fabulous sponsors over the years. Ford sponsored the American Women’s Everest Expedition and had it not been for them, I would never have had the opportunity to climb that mountain. Finding financial sponsors is no easy task; you have to cast a very wide net and be okay with rejection, because you typically get a hundred companies that say “no” before one says “yes.” You need the “never give up” attitude not only when you’re on the mountain, but also when you’re in search of funding. If there’s something you really want to do, you’ll figure out how to get the money.

I&S: How have your experiences helped you in your career as a leadership author/speaker? Do you equate expedition planning with an executive’s ability to guide his/her company to success in the market?

AL: There are a lot of parallels between the challenges I face in the mountains and the challenges faced by businesspeople. The environments we operate in are similar in that they are unpredictable and are constantly shifting and changing. You have to be able to manage risk and deal with the unexpected. Had I not had these expedition experiences, I wouldn’t have the fabulous opportunities that I have today. I feel incredibly lucky to have spent several years on the adjunct faculty at West Point and to currently serve on the board of the Thayer Leader Development Group (which shares West Point leadership best practices with corporate executives). I also serve on the board of the Coach K Center on Leadership and Ethics at Duke University, which is also a privilege for which I am very grateful. Yes, I teach, but I also learn. I will always be a student of leadership no matter what it is that I am doing.

I&S: Is it possible to teach leadership to others if they have not faced adversity? Or is it possible to create exercises to evoke leadership?

AL: Yes! I believe it is indeed possible to teach anyone about leadership and I also believe that leadership has nothing to do with having an “official title.” Leadership is everyone’s responsibility because we are all responsible for looking out for the people around us. Of course if you have faced a lot of adversity then you already have the inner-strength and determination which helps build strong leaders. The other thing to remember is that one person might view a particular situation as challenging when someone else could look at it and think it is no big deal. Everyone has a different definition of adversity. One of the reasons I wrote the book was to give people guidance on how to become a leader of consequence that has a positive impact on those around them.

I&S: You’ve held several jobs over the years in parallel with your time spent abroad. Is the author/speaker role going to be your profession going forward or do you expect some new challenge to lure you away? What would cause you to drop everything right now and go?

AL: I am loving the author/speaker job because it gives me something I could never have in a corporate job: flexibility in my schedule and unlimited vacation time (should I choose to take it). I can tell my agent, “hey, don’t book me for any speeches in July because I am heading to the mountains.” I can take two months off if I am doing a big expedition and then hit the ground running again on the speaker’s circuit when I get back. Of course this year has been a little more intense because of the book tour, so I haven’t had much “vacation time.” But heck, it’s my first book (my baby!!!) so I don’t mind being on the road all the time in order to promote it. I don’t see my career taking any major turns anytime soon. The only thing that would make me drop everything right now is if someone I loved needed me to be there to care for them. People are always more important than jobs.

I&S: Can you tell us about your book, On The Edge: The Art of High-Impact Leadership? From first draft to final format, how long did it take you to write? How was your reception from potential publishers? How did Hachette win you over?

AL: Never in a million years would I have thought I could write a book that would end up on the New York Times bestseller list. I had been approached by a number of publishers and literary agents over the past decade but never really followed up with any of them because I did not feel a sense of urgency to actually start writing—probably because I just didn’t feel “ready” at that point. Well, I hit the speaking circuit in 2006 and after every speech a bunch of people would come up to me and say, ”Oh – that was great! What is the name of your book? I really want to read it.” Awkward moment…”Uh…I don’t have a book.” Then they would say, “WHAT? How can you not have a book?” After hearing that for a few years I decided it was time to make it happen. I thought it was important to share the lessons I have learned in these beautiful yet dangerous places, and given I can only reach so many people through my speeches, I figured a book was the best way to increase my “reach.” I wanted to tell the good, the bad and the ugly. I did not want it to be a book about accomplishment. I wanted to focus on the hits and the misses, the stumbles, the heartbreaks and the failures. I wanted to be able to share the things that I might not be able to share when there are people from the Human Resources department standing in the back of the room. The book allows me to do that. It is definitely edgier than the speech (although the speech is fairly edgy as well). I probably spent six months in “serious writing mode,” but you could say that my expedition journals were the beginnings of it all…and those were started back in 2002.
Because the book presents a very unique view on leadership and achievement, we had a lot of interest from publishers. My literary agent (Dupree Miller) was able to set up meetings with four of the “Big Five” publishers. Hachette won me over because the editor I met with had published other leadership books by people I really admired—like Coach K, Hank Paulson and Tiger Woods (pre-scandal). And also…they were willing to give me a very generous advance, which signaled that they really believed in me as an author and were willing to throw a lot of support behind my book.

I&S: Where can readers find your book along with your schedule for upcoming presentations?

AL: On the Edge is available online at 800CEORead , Amazon,  Barnes & Noble, or people can buy it from their favorite independent book-seller. It is also available as an audiobook (and it’s my voice reading the audio version).

As far as my presentations go, most of them are keynotes I deliver at corporate events. But several times a year I speak at events that are open to the public. Those will always be listed on the homepage banner of my website at www.alisonlevine.com and will be announced on my twitter feed @levine_alison.

I&S: Potential is realized only when one pushes beyond the comfort zone. Who among us can say we really push ourselves beyond our limits? Is feeling “stressed” a response to such situations or is this an emotional consequence of not preparing for the ordeal ahead? We urge you to read Ms. Levine’s book so you understand the difference…and how action and preparation can lead to better outcomes in your life.

At age 44, this American mountain climber, explorer, sportswoman and entrepreneur completed the last degree Adventure Grand Slam by reaching the summit of Mt. Everest. She has since transitioned into being a motivational and leadership speaker as well as being an author who penned a New York Times bestseller. She’s an inspiration to us and we hope you’ll feel likewise. Meet Ms. Adventure Alison Levine.

I&S: In your travels around the globe you have most likely met hundreds of fellow travelers. What do you perceive as the commonalities among those who seek the thrill of adventuring? Have you any reason to believe that some people are born adventurers?

AL: One thing that most adventurers have in common is a strong sense of curiosity. Curiosity not just about what lies “off the beaten track” – but a curiosity about themselves. They aren’t afraid to test themselves and operate completely outside of their comfort zones. Adventurers also have a need to see, feel and understand what lies outside of the everyday environments that surround most people on a day-to-day basis. As far as being “born” an adventurer – I actually think that anyone can catch the adventure bug and that it is more a function of the combination of that sense of curiosity mixed with open-mindedness and encouragement from people in your circle (and by that I mean parents, friends, teachers, siblings, etc. – anyone who has an influencing role in someone’s life).

I&S: What triggered your desire to mountaineer and/or expedition to the North/South poles? Can you describe the feeling of accomplishment you get from achieving your goals?

AL: From the time I was younger I was always very intrigued by the stories of the early mountaineers and the early Arctic and Antarctic explorers. I would read books and watch documentary films about them…and could never seem to take in enough information about these adventurers. I had my second heart surgery when I turned 30 (the first was at age 17 was not successful at correcting the heart defect I was born with) and after that a light bulb went on in my head and I thought: If I really want to know what it’s like to explore these extreme environments, then I should go experience them myself instead of simply reading about them.
As for the feeling of accomplishment, the things I focus on have changed over the years as I’ve grown older and wiser (well, hopefully wiser!). Instead of focusing on getting to the tops of mountains, I focus on what I can do to be the MVP of my team. While it’s always a bonus to get to the top of the mountain or to the North or South Pole, my goal is for the people on my team to look back on the experience and think, ”I am really glad she was part of our team.” That is what gives me that sense of accomplishment.

I&S: Preparation must play a large part in your journeys. Can you tell us about the physical, mental and practical considerations leading up to the start of one of your trips? Where do sponsorships come in with regard to going on expeditions?

AL: The only way to really prepare for a serious expedition is to simulate what it is that you’ll be doing during the trip. For example, if I am going to try to tackle a big mountain, I have to get out to the mountains to train. That means a six hour drive for me (each way) as I prefer to train on Mt. Shasta which is about 300 miles from my home in northern California. If I’m going to be dragging a 150 pound sled across the Arctic Circle or across the Antarctic continent then I have to try to simulate that experience. That means going out to the beach and harnessing a couple of tires to my waist and dragging them across the sand in order to simulate dragging the heavy sled across the ice. This is part of the physical and mental training because a lot of the time it can feel monotonous – and that feeling can certainly be part of these expeditions too! Training in a gym is not really going to help me prepare properly—mentally or physically.
As far as the sponsorships go, I have been very lucky in that I have been able to secure fabulous sponsors over the years. Ford sponsored the American Women’s Everest Expedition and had it not been for them, I would never have had the opportunity to climb that mountain. Finding financial sponsors is no easy task; you have to cast a very wide net and be okay with rejection, because you typically get a hundred companies that say “no” before one says “yes.” You need the “never give up” attitude not only when you’re on the mountain, but also when you’re in search of funding. If there’s something you really want to do, you’ll figure out how to get the money.

I&S: How have your experiences helped you in your career as a leadership author/speaker? Do you equate expedition planning with an executive’s ability to guide his/her company to success in the market?

AL: There are a lot of parallels between the challenges I face in the mountains and the challenges faced by businesspeople. The environments we operate in are similar in that they are unpredictable and are constantly shifting and changing. You have to be able to manage risk and deal with the unexpected. Had I not had these expedition experiences, I wouldn’t have the fabulous opportunities that I have today. I feel incredibly lucky to have spent several years on the adjunct faculty at West Point and to currently serve on the board of the Thayer Leader Development Group (which shares West Point leadership best practices with corporate executives). I also serve on the board of the Coach K Center on Leadership and Ethics at Duke University, which is also a privilege for which I am very grateful. Yes, I teach, but I also learn. I will always be a student of leadership no matter what it is that I am doing.

I&S: Is it possible to teach leadership to others if they have not faced adversity? Or is it possible to create exercises to evoke leadership?

AL: Yes! I believe it is indeed possible to teach anyone about leadership and I also believe that leadership has nothing to do with having an “official title.” Leadership is everyone’s responsibility because we are all responsible for looking out for the people around us. Of course if you have faced a lot of adversity then you already have the inner-strength and determination which helps build strong leaders. The other thing to remember is that one person might view a particular situation as challenging when someone else could look at it and think it is no big deal. Everyone has a different definition of adversity. One of the reasons I wrote the book was to give people guidance on how to become a leader of consequence that has a positive impact on those around them.

I&S: You’ve held several jobs over the years in parallel with your time spent abroad. Is the author/speaker role going to be your profession going forward or do you expect some new challenge to lure you away? What would cause you to drop everything right now and go?

AL: I am loving the author/speaker job because it gives me something I could never have in a corporate job: flexibility in my schedule and unlimited vacation time (should I choose to take it). I can tell my agent, “hey, don’t book me for any speeches in July because I am heading to the mountains.” I can take two months off if I am doing a big expedition and then hit the ground running again on the speaker’s circuit when I get back. Of course this year has been a little more intense because of the book tour, so I haven’t had much “vacation time.” But heck, it’s my first book (my baby!!!) so I don’t mind being on the road all the time in order to promote it. I don’t see my career taking any major turns anytime soon. The only thing that would make me drop everything right now is if someone I loved needed me to be there to care for them. People are always more important than jobs.

I&S: Can you tell us about your book, On The Edge: The Art of High-Impact Leadership? From first draft to final format, how long did it take you to write? How was your reception from potential publishers? How did Hachette win you over?

AL: Never in a million years would I have thought I could write a book that would end up on the New York Times bestseller list. I had been approached by a number of publishers and literary agents over the past decade but never really followed up with any of them because I did not feel a sense of urgency to actually start writing—probably because I just didn’t feel “ready” at that point. Well, I hit the speaking circuit in 2006 and after every speech a bunch of people would come up to me and say, ”Oh – that was great! What is the name of your book? I really want to read it.” Awkward moment…”Uh…I don’t have a book.” Then they would say, “WHAT? How can you not have a book?” After hearing that for a few years I decided it was time to make it happen. I thought it was important to share the lessons I have learned in these beautiful yet dangerous places, and given I can only reach so many people through my speeches, I figured a book was the best way to increase my “reach.” I wanted to tell the good, the bad and the ugly. I did not want it to be a book about accomplishment. I wanted to focus on the hits and the misses, the stumbles, the heartbreaks and the failures. I wanted to be able to share the things that I might not be able to share when there are people from the Human Resources department standing in the back of the room. The book allows me to do that. It is definitely edgier than the speech (although the speech is fairly edgy as well). I probably spent six months in “serious writing mode,” but you could say that my expedition journals were the beginnings of it all…and those were started back in 2002.
Because the book presents a very unique view on leadership and achievement, we had a lot of interest from publishers. My literary agent (Dupree Miller) was able to set up meetings with four of the “Big Five” publishers. Hachette won me over because the editor I met with had published other leadership books by people I really admired—like Coach K, Hank Paulson and Tiger Woods (pre-scandal). And also…they were willing to give me a very generous advance, which signaled that they really believed in me as an author and were willing to throw a lot of support behind my book.

I&S: Where can readers find your book along with your schedule for upcoming presentations?

AL: On the Edge is available online at 800CEORead , Amazon,  Barnes & Noble, or people can buy it from their favorite independent book-seller. It is also available as an audiobook (and it’s my voice reading the audio version).

As far as my presentations go, most of them are keynotes I deliver at corporate events. But several times a year I speak at events that are open to the public. Those will always be listed on the homepage banner of my website at www.alisonlevine.com and will be announced on my twitter feed @levine_alison.

I&S: Potential is realized only when one pushes beyond the comfort zone. Who among us can say we really push ourselves beyond our limits? Is feeling “stressed” a response to such situations or is this an emotional consequence of not preparing for the ordeal ahead? We urge you to read Ms. Levine’s book so you understand the difference…and how action and preparation can lead to better outcomes in your life.

At age 44, this American mountain climber, explorer, sportswoman and entrepreneur completed the last degree Adventure Grand Slam by reaching the summit of Mt. Everest. She has since transitioned into being a motivational and leadership speaker as well as being an author who penned a New York Times bestseller. She’s an inspiration to us and we hope you’ll feel likewise. Meet Ms. Adventure Alison Levine.

I&S: In your travels around the globe you have most likely met hundreds of fellow travelers. What do you perceive as the commonalities among those who seek the thrill of adventuring? Have you any reason to believe that some people are born adventurers?

AL: One thing that most adventurers have in common is a strong sense of curiosity. Curiosity not just about what lies “off the beaten track” – but a curiosity about themselves. They aren’t afraid to test themselves and operate completely outside of their comfort zones. Adventurers also have a need to see, feel and understand what lies outside of the everyday environments that surround most people on a day-to-day basis. As far as being “born” an adventurer – I actually think that anyone can catch the adventure bug and that it is more a function of the combination of that sense of curiosity mixed with open-mindedness and encouragement from people in your circle (and by that I mean parents, friends, teachers, siblings, etc. – anyone who has an influencing role in someone’s life).

I&S: What triggered your desire to mountaineer and/or expedition to the North/South poles? Can you describe the feeling of accomplishment you get from achieving your goals?

AL: From the time I was younger I was always very intrigued by the stories of the early mountaineers and the early Arctic and Antarctic explorers. I would read books and watch documentary films about them…and could never seem to take in enough information about these adventurers. I had my second heart surgery when I turned 30 (the first was at age 17 was not successful at correcting the heart defect I was born with) and after that a light bulb went on in my head and I thought: If I really want to know what it’s like to explore these extreme environments, then I should go experience them myself instead of simply reading about them.
As for the feeling of accomplishment, the things I focus on have changed over the years as I’ve grown older and wiser (well, hopefully wiser!). Instead of focusing on getting to the tops of mountains, I focus on what I can do to be the MVP of my team. While it’s always a bonus to get to the top of the mountain or to the North or South Pole, my goal is for the people on my team to look back on the experience and think, ”I am really glad she was part of our team.” That is what gives me that sense of accomplishment.

I&S: Preparation must play a large part in your journeys. Can you tell us about the physical, mental and practical considerations leading up to the start of one of your trips? Where do sponsorships come in with regard to going on expeditions?

AL: The only way to really prepare for a serious expedition is to simulate what it is that you’ll be doing during the trip. For example, if I am going to try to tackle a big mountain, I have to get out to the mountains to train. That means a six hour drive for me (each way) as I prefer to train on Mt. Shasta which is about 300 miles from my home in northern California. If I’m going to be dragging a 150 pound sled across the Arctic Circle or across the Antarctic continent then I have to try to simulate that experience. That means going out to the beach and harnessing a couple of tires to my waist and dragging them across the sand in order to simulate dragging the heavy sled across the ice. This is part of the physical and mental training because a lot of the time it can feel monotonous – and that feeling can certainly be part of these expeditions too! Training in a gym is not really going to help me prepare properly—mentally or physically.
As far as the sponsorships go, I have been very lucky in that I have been able to secure fabulous sponsors over the years. Ford sponsored the American Women’s Everest Expedition and had it not been for them, I would never have had the opportunity to climb that mountain. Finding financial sponsors is no easy task; you have to cast a very wide net and be okay with rejection, because you typically get a hundred companies that say “no” before one says “yes.” You need the “never give up” attitude not only when you’re on the mountain, but also when you’re in search of funding. If there’s something you really want to do, you’ll figure out how to get the money.

I&S: How have your experiences helped you in your career as a leadership author/speaker? Do you equate expedition planning with an executive’s ability to guide his/her company to success in the market?

AL: There are a lot of parallels between the challenges I face in the mountains and the challenges faced by businesspeople. The environments we operate in are similar in that they are unpredictable and are constantly shifting and changing. You have to be able to manage risk and deal with the unexpected. Had I not had these expedition experiences, I wouldn’t have the fabulous opportunities that I have today. I feel incredibly lucky to have spent several years on the adjunct faculty at West Point and to currently serve on the board of the Thayer Leader Development Group (which shares West Point leadership best practices with corporate executives). I also serve on the board of the Coach K Center on Leadership and Ethics at Duke University, which is also a privilege for which I am very grateful. Yes, I teach, but I also learn. I will always be a student of leadership no matter what it is that I am doing.

I&S: Is it possible to teach leadership to others if they have not faced adversity? Or is it possible to create exercises to evoke leadership?

AL: Yes! I believe it is indeed possible to teach anyone about leadership and I also believe that leadership has nothing to do with having an “official title.” Leadership is everyone’s responsibility because we are all responsible for looking out for the people around us. Of course if you have faced a lot of adversity then you already have the inner-strength and determination which helps build strong leaders. The other thing to remember is that one person might view a particular situation as challenging when someone else could look at it and think it is no big deal. Everyone has a different definition of adversity. One of the reasons I wrote the book was to give people guidance on how to become a leader of consequence that has a positive impact on those around them.

I&S: You’ve held several jobs over the years in parallel with your time spent abroad. Is the author/speaker role going to be your profession going forward or do you expect some new challenge to lure you away? What would cause you to drop everything right now and go?

AL: I am loving the author/speaker job because it gives me something I could never have in a corporate job: flexibility in my schedule and unlimited vacation time (should I choose to take it). I can tell my agent, “hey, don’t book me for any speeches in July because I am heading to the mountains.” I can take two months off if I am doing a big expedition and then hit the ground running again on the speaker’s circuit when I get back. Of course this year has been a little more intense because of the book tour, so I haven’t had much “vacation time.” But heck, it’s my first book (my baby!!!) so I don’t mind being on the road all the time in order to promote it. I don’t see my career taking any major turns anytime soon. The only thing that would make me drop everything right now is if someone I loved needed me to be there to care for them. People are always more important than jobs.

I&S: Can you tell us about your book, On The Edge: The Art of High-Impact Leadership? From first draft to final format, how long did it take you to write? How was your reception from potential publishers? How did Hachette win you over?

AL: Never in a million years would I have thought I could write a book that would end up on the New York Times bestseller list. I had been approached by a number of publishers and literary agents over the past decade but never really followed up with any of them because I did not feel a sense of urgency to actually start writing—probably because I just didn’t feel “ready” at that point. Well, I hit the speaking circuit in 2006 and after every speech a bunch of people would come up to me and say, ”Oh – that was great! What is the name of your book? I really want to read it.” Awkward moment…”Uh…I don’t have a book.” Then they would say, “WHAT? How can you not have a book?” After hearing that for a few years I decided it was time to make it happen. I thought it was important to share the lessons I have learned in these beautiful yet dangerous places, and given I can only reach so many people through my speeches, I figured a book was the best way to increase my “reach.” I wanted to tell the good, the bad and the ugly. I did not want it to be a book about accomplishment. I wanted to focus on the hits and the misses, the stumbles, the heartbreaks and the failures. I wanted to be able to share the things that I might not be able to share when there are people from the Human Resources department standing in the back of the room. The book allows me to do that. It is definitely edgier than the speech (although the speech is fairly edgy as well). I probably spent six months in “serious writing mode,” but you could say that my expedition journals were the beginnings of it all…and those were started back in 2002.
Because the book presents a very unique view on leadership and achievement, we had a lot of interest from publishers. My literary agent (Dupree Miller) was able to set up meetings with four of the “Big Five” publishers. Hachette won me over because the editor I met with had published other leadership books by people I really admired—like Coach K, Hank Paulson and Tiger Woods (pre-scandal). And also…they were willing to give me a very generous advance, which signaled that they really believed in me as an author and were willing to throw a lot of support behind my book.

I&S: Where can readers find your book along with your schedule for upcoming presentations?

AL: On the Edge is available online at 800CEORead , Amazon,  Barnes & Noble, or people can buy it from their favorite independent book-seller. It is also available as an audiobook (and it’s my voice reading the audio version).

As far as my presentations go, most of them are keynotes I deliver at corporate events. But several times a year I speak at events that are open to the public. Those will always be listed on the homepage banner of my website at www.alisonlevine.com and will be announced on my twitter feed @levine_alison.

I&S: Potential is realized only when one pushes beyond the comfort zone. Who among us can say we really push ourselves beyond our limits? Is feeling “stressed” a response to such situations or is this an emotional consequence of not preparing for the ordeal ahead? We urge you to read Ms. Levine’s book so you understand the difference…and how action and preparation can lead to better outcomes in your life.